What is your favorite color!?!

This week we’re talking about well developed characters.

The most important part of a character is their story. This seems like it should be obvious, but to really know a characters story, you have to get into the finer details of it. Take, for example, the noble knight trying to save the fair princess from the dragon. Why? Is he fighting for her hand in marriage? If so, is it because he is in love with her? If so, why? Does her beauty entice him, or is he thrilled by the idea of being a prince or king in a few years? Did he decide to rescue her because he couldn’t find real work or has he been training to fight monsters for years?

Even that, though, is just a framework. What a character did is nowhere near as important as why a character does what they do. Ask your character questions about how they think, and the whys of their life will become clear. Does the warrior who became a warrior because he was naturally gifted and never excelled at intellectual pursuits fob any thinking heavy tasks off on someone else and have a hard time empathizing with those who aren’t as physically fit, or does he work hard to overcome his shortcomings and protect his weaker friends. Does the character with the hard knock life scrimp and scrounge to horde every penny or work hard to make life better for those who are growing up in situations similar to his own.

In Arcanum, in the first town the player visits, there is a blacksmith. Of course there is, the player needs swords and they have to come from somewhere. The blacksmith is surly, as they are stereotypically, but generally helpful. However, if the player is an elf, the blacksmith reveals himself to be a bitter racist who nigh throws them out of his store, although a sufficiently charismatic character can convince him to aid them. Well developed, interesting characters don’t necessarily take a long time to make or to convey, but they make or break a story.

So remember, make a character a person, and when you know who they are you’ll know how to write them.

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One thought on “What is your favorite color!?!

  1. In an urban arcana adventure, the party wandered upon some sort of Bedouin like camel nomads. The DM added to the entire story by making them think my character was a wild mage because of his blue shirt (he was therefor a blue-robe). Even more interesting, blue-robes were expected to have forsaken all familial ties, so they were then surprised when I gave them my surname. Perhaps the concept was taken from a book I had not read, but it still added to the quality of the story.

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