Put a little music on.

This week we’re talking about setting the mood. Awwww yeah.

It’s important to make sure players understand the mood of the game they are taking part in, and it’s your job to make sure they do. Tailor your portrayal of the game world to the type of mood you wish to project to your player. If a town is full of poor peasants, perhaps they are wearing ragged clothes and looking gaunt in a relatively bright world or maybe they are wasting away by the side of the road, rattling begging cups with the stubs of missing limbs while flies buzz around their filthy rags if the world is altogether darker. A fighter’s strike can cripple and enemy’s leg, sending it crashing to the ground and granting the warrior a great advantage, or maybe the blow sheared through the beast’s leg, spraying blood everywhere as the monster collapsed in a mewling pile in a puddle of it’s own blood, bearing it’s unprotected neck to the fighter. In both examples, the same situation is being described both to different extremes and with different tonal details. A thesaurus is your best friend in a situation like this, and I honestly suggest looking up a couple of words you might use (dirty, poor, wounded, broken) and finding the synonyms that best fit your tone.

The way you choose to describe or show scenery also affect the mood of the game. A building collapsing, spewing dust and debris everywhere as it topples to the ground, can be either majestic or terrifying. A building collapsing on a crowded street, with the still trapped people inside desperately banging on the glass is a gut wrenching idea. An audience with the king inside a regal, gilded hall full of retainers in fine clothes is much more uplifting then the same audience with a king in an ill-lit hall of fading tapestries, dirty fixtures, and sneering courtesans.

Out of character things can also be a major factor in the manufacture of mood. Most horror games are best played with the lights down low, with occasional segments of brightness, while a game of adventure on the deep desert might stay brightly lit as much as possible until the in-game night fall. Sounds are also important, with good background music greatly enhancing the power of the storytelling. A spooky, low track is perfect for exploring a haunted house, something fast paced and high simulates an epic battle quite well, and it’s even possible to get one’s hands on the sounds of crowds, forests, and similar settings should they be present in the game.

So remember, use words that reflect the mood, describe things that reflect the mood, install a dimmer switch, and get speakers for your iPod.

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